Archive for the ‘Natural Turf Troubles’ Category

Fake grass the landscaping solution for coastal properties

Friday, February 28th, 2014

Gardens in coastal areas can be problematic.  The climate presents many challenges – strong winds, frequent storms, sea spray, and sandy soil are bad news for gardeners.  Leaving property owners with patchy, lack-lustre lawns, and parched, withered plants.

The biggest problem with coastal landscaping is the wind.  Ferocious winds carry salt and sand which desiccate grass lawns, plants and trees.  Experts recommend using a wind break, a hedgerow or fence to shelter your garden from the high winds.  This may save a few plants but isn’t ideal when it comes to lawn care, because grass doesn’t fare well in the shade. 

The second issue with seaside gardens is soil quality.  The soil can be salty, sandy and lacking in nutrients.  It is often light and fine and therefore is blown away in high winds.  This exposes the roots of grass and plants which are dried out by the sun.  You’re left with a parched and patchy lawn and shrivelled shallow-rooted plants.

It’s a nightmare for those that own holiday homes by the sea, because you’re not there to give your garden the extra attention it needs.  If you’re property is on the sea-front storms can cause salt water to wash over your garden, and winds will batter your plants with beach sand. 

Fake grass is the ideal solution to give you a lush green lawn by the sea.  Unaffected by the coastal climate, it will give you a beautiful garden with none of the hassle.  If you have an apartment, you can even use it to cover balconies or terraces, any salt residue will simply wash off. 

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Why have I got a moss lawn instead of grass?

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Moss is a non-flowering sponge-like plant that spreads like wild-fire in the right environment.  In the UK, rainy weather in our sheltered back-gardens makes it a common problem.   If you’ve more moss than grass, here are a few helpful hints.

Cutting too short

Mowing your lawn any shorter than 2.5cm (1in) can cause moss.  Cutting too short weakens the grass, allowing moss to spread easily.  You should keep grass blades longer, yet mow more regularly because it encourages the spread of grass plants.

Drainage

Moss thrives in damp conditions.  The plant must have a damp environment to grow because it has it has no water-proofing systems to prevent its tissue water evaporating.  It also needs surrounding water to reproduce.  Try spiking to improve drainage.

Shady areas

If you have shaded or sheltered areas that get little or no sun or wind to dry out the lawn, you’ll get problems.  Try to cut back shrubs, hedges and trees to reduce shade.

Low nutrient level

If your grass is unhealthy due to poor soil conditions, moss can take over.  Treat your lawn, preferably with a product that contains moss killer.

Ever thought about faking it?

To maintain a neat, tidy, moss-free lawn takes a lot of work.  If you have a North facing garden or very poor drainage, you may be fighting a losing battle.  Have you ever considered artificial grass?  You can finally have a beautiful lush green lawn, with no weeds, moss or patching.  And there’s virtually no maintenance.

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Why waste 20 hours a year lawn mowing?

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014

If you mow your lawn for 1 hour per week from May-September, you waste 20 hours of free time a year.  Lawn maintenance is time consuming.  With an artificial lawn, you can forget about your grass for good, and give yourself back a hard-earned rest at the weekend.

The little and often rule is the key to good grass care – but who has the time?  Gardening experts recommend you should cut your grass at least once a week in Spring and Autumn, and twice weekly in the Summer months when it grows faster.  You cannot cheat and clip short because this weakens the blades so moss and weeds take over.  If you follow guidelines by the RHS, that’s actually 30 hours a year, assuming it takes you 1 hour to do the job.

Then there’s the edge trimming, weed removal, patch repair and feeding to keep it looking tip top.  As well as this, you’re spending money on electricity, water and fertilisers.  It’s no wonder so many Brits faking it these days.

Artificial lawns require very little maintenance – just a quick brush down once and a while to keep the fibres in good condition.  Installing one could give you an extra day of free time per year – maybe even 2 days.

Many people enjoy the fresh air and exercise they get from mowing the garden…but imagine how much more fun you could have instead – perhaps going for a walk in the park or kicking a ball around with the kids?  Don’t waste your precious spare time, call us on 01371 87 5901 for a free fake lawn quote.

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Are you fed up with your front garden?

Saturday, January 11th, 2014

front garden artificial grass install essexFront gardens are seldom used – they’re purely for aesthetics, to make a property’s exterior look more attractive and appealing.  We Brits like our privacy, spending our Saturday afternoons relaxing round the back, away from prying eyes.  With such busy lives, it’s no wonder that many of us begrudge time-consuming maintenance at the front.

Front gardens tend to be smaller, because space at the rear is much more desirable.  No matter how big your lawn, it requires all the same maintenance – mowing, edging, weeding, fertilising.  And for such a small surface area, you probably question whether it’s worth it.

Ever threatened to gravel it over?  You won’t be the first.  In fact, according to the RHS, 23 per cent of front gardens in the South east are paved (over three quarters of surface area).  In the north east, this figure jumps to 47%.  But, hard landscaping is expensive and it’s not the same as looking at a lovely green lawn.   That’s where artificial grass comes in.

There’s no need to give up your grass.  Nor do you need to opt for a depressing gravel solution that will diminish the visual appeal of your home.  Artificial grass is relatively inexpensive, easy to install and gives you a beautiful, lush green lawn without the maintenance.  You can forget about the front, it won’t take up any more of your time – enjoy a gorgeous garden that looks just like the real thing.

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Artificial Grass for Small Gardens

Friday, December 27th, 2013

fake grass in a small gardenThere’s a lot of hassle involved in keeping grass, and unfortunately it doesn’t matter what the surface area.  If you’ve got a small garden, you’ve probably threatened to gravel it over many times – questioning whether it’s worth it for such a small patch of greenery.

Is there really any point?

To keep your small grass area neat, it takes a lot of work.  You dig out the extension lead, unlock the shed, haul out the mower…then start to cut.  Yet you only run over the grass for a few steps, before you have to turn round and go back again.

Little, yet often

The smaller the space, the less you can get away with.   Just a few weeds can make it look like a jungle – so you have to work on it more often.  Even if you’ve only neglected it for a couple of weeks, your garden will always look worse than a larger plot.

No room for a shed

Having a lawn becomes problematic if you’ve nowhere to store your maintenance equipment.  If your garden is really small, you may lose a significant proportion by installing a shed to store a lawn mower, tools, pesticides, and fertilisers to keep you lawn looking good.

Artificial grass is the perfect solution for small gardens.  It’s maintenance free and looks pristine all year round.  You get to keep a lush green grass garden, with none of the practical problems you get with the real thing.

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Rabbit problems and artificial lawns

Thursday, October 3rd, 2013

artificial lawns rabbitsLast week we wrote about artificial lawns as a solution to fox problems.  We had a question from a reader who wondered whether it would deter rabbits too.  The answer is yes, artificial grass will certainly stop rabbits from digging up your garden.

In Britain, wild rabbits cause an estimated £100 million pounds worth of crop damage every year.  And it’s not just farmers that suffer, they to love to dig, especially in the short grass found in gardens.  They can’t help it, it’s a natural instinct.  Contrary to popular belief, rabbits are not necessarily trying to burrow, sometimes they’re in search of tasty young shoots.

What can you do about it?  Well, you could try an animal repellent (pellets or spray).  Another option is a motion-activated sprinkler device.  Many people choose to install an artificial lawn to solve the problem for good.  Of course, it won’t stop them eating from your vegetable patch, but they’ll not be able to dig any more holes.  Artificial grass has lots of other benefits, giving you an immaculate, lush green lawn all year round.

If you keep pet rabbits, you’ll have the same problem, digging is one of their favourite pastimes.  A great way to prevent pet rabbits from digging your lawn is to give them a substitute, a sand pit or large plant pot filled with soil should do the trick.  Or, you could  install an artificial lawn – it’s safe for all types of pets.  The best thing is, the mess is easy to clean up, without any stains to your grass.  The picture is an artificial grass lawn we installed for a bunny owner in Essex.

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Artificial lawns – the best solution to urban fox problems

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

fox problems in gardensAround 13% of Britain’s fox population live in urban areas, this equates to 33,000 individuals.  Spacious suburban gardens provide the ideal habitat for them.  Contrary to what you see on TV, they rarely scavenge through litter bins.  However, they do love to dig up lawns.

Foxes often dig small holes in lawns when they’re hunting worms in wet weather.  In the Spring and Summer months, fox cubs are the culprits.  They dig playfully, with an annoying tendency to reopen the holes once they’ve been filled in.

It’s very difficult to foxes out because an adult can squeeze through a 10cm gap, as well as scale a 2m high wall or fence.  When it comes to prevention, there are not many options.  You can use a commercial animal repellent.  This comes in liquid form and you water (or spray) the areas most affected.  It works by creating an artificial scent mark, as foxes are territorial they get nervous when they cannot identify the scent and are scared away from the area.  It isn’t always effective and unfortunately, some people resort to putting down broken glass and metal spikes.  This is against the law and you can be prosecuted if an animal is injured under the animal welfare act.

What’s the best solution?  An artificial lawn.  It’s impenetrable, so even if they try, they won’t be able to dig.  Plus, you’re eliminating the worm problem.  Foxes don’t just eat small rodents, rabbits and birds.  Worms and insects make up over 15% of their diet.  This can be higher depending on what food is available in the area, and the time of year.  By installing an artificial lawn, you’re eradicating the food source too.

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Why kids love artificial lawns

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

family garden with artificial lawnIt’s coming up to that time of year…the end of term and no school for 6 whole weeks.  During the holidays it’s great to see children playing outside, getting lots of exercise and fresh air.  You want to see them out the in garden kicking a ball around, bouncing on the trampoline, or catching frogs and collecting bugs.  This means wear on your lawn.

Kids can do lots of damage in 6 wks – creating pathways and patches under the swing – turning your immaculately kept lawn into an unsightly mess.  Every item of clothing they possess becomes grass stained and no matter what you try, they won’t come out.

Then there’s the mud.  When it’s been raining you daren’t let them out in the garden; that is unless you’ve got a spare hour to wash trainers, shoes and mop footprints from your kitchen floor.  Plus, if they play on the soggy grass they’ll do more damage to the lawn.

Be free of all this hassle

Kids love artificial lawns.  Why?  Because they get the freedom to play outside whatever the weather.  Fake grass means no wear, no patches, no mud, no stains.  They won’t damage the lawn, ruin their clothing or risk walking mud through the house – they can just enjoy the outdoors.  You don’t need to stress about what they’re up to, or nag them to take off their shoes.  Instead, you can encourage them to play outdoors more often – rather than sitting in front of the TV.

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5 Lawn Problems you can solve with Fake Grass

Sunday, June 16th, 2013

Family garden fake lawn in Romford1. North facing

Lawns need around 4 hours of light a day to stay healthy.  North facing gardens are not so much of a problem in the summer because the sun is higher in the sky.   The winter however can be a nightmare.  The damp conditions cause algae, slime, and moss growth; you may even get the odd mushroom.

2. Over-shadowed

If your house, neighbouring buildings, or tall trees cast a huge shadow over your lawn, it probably won’t get enough sunlight.  Grass in a shaded garden is normally patchy and mossy and you’ll have the hassle of re-seeding every year.

3. South facing

Lawns in sunny gardens can get scorched in the direct sunlight, turning grass from lush green to yellow/brown.  Lawn watering is normally more costly, using more water means higher monthly bills.

4. Outdoor play equipment

Swings, slides, and climbing frames leave unsightly marks on your lawn.  Wear and patching is inevitable.  Trampolines are the worst as the grass area underneath the mat is blocked out so gets zero sun.

5. Fruit trees

Falling apples, pears, plums or cherries can cause a lot of mess.  Sticky, rotting fruit will attract pests into your garden and the remains are hard to clear up.  You cannot clean natural grass.

If you’ve got any of these lawn problems, fake grass could transform your garden, making it more attractive, more usable, and less hassle.  You can be free of maintenance, save money on treatments, and start enjoying your outdoor space.

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Unable to mow your lawn? Fed up of paying a gardener to keep your grass neat?

Saturday, May 18th, 2013

artificial grass suppliersKeeping the garden looking good is a nightmare for those who have mobility problems.  If you’re not physically able to mow your lawn, you may have to pay a gardener to do for you.  This is very costly over time, especially for elderly people who are living on a pension, or those claiming benefits.

Other than that, you’re reliant on friends or relatives to give up their spare time.  And you probably feel bad for asking.  This means there are times when you have to put up with a jungle growing out the back, ruining the view from your conservatory.

Consider investing in a new artificial grass lawn.  It has many benefits.  Firstly, there’s no maintenance.  You get an immaculate lawn, without having to pay the local gardener, or bothering relatives to do it for you.  This won’t just save you money on mowing and trimming, but watering too. Your bills will be reduced and you’re helping to save water.

Since it’s advent in the 1960s fake grass has improved dramatically.  A fake lawn is virtually indistinguishable from the real thing.  Not only does it look real, it feels the same too. So, you can still take your shoes off and enjoy a relaxing afternoon in the garden.

If you’re in the Essex area, we can install your new lawn from just £45 per square meter.  This is a fully inclusive price for the grass itself, labour, tools, materials etc.  Give us call on 01371 875 901 for a free estimate.

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OUR LOCATION

Leisure Tech Artificial Lawns
2 Pens Cottage, Doctors Pond
Great Dunmow
Essex, CM6 1BB

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